All posts tagged: Society

Photo by Scott Webb on Unsplash

Why do you do what you do?

Recently, I’ve had several conversations about motivation and intention—why some women aim to look a certain way, get really lean, strong or, some would say, “look like men”; post fitness progress pictures on Instagram; or pursue physical activity to an extent some would consider a little too much. Why yoga? Why crossfit? Why running? Why this or that?

Photo by Clem Onojeghuo on Unsplash

Long-distance relationship: is it for you?

Let me tell you this right away: no one can answer this for you except, well… you. Being in a couple when you’re both in the same city or same home is hard enough, and maintaining an LDR is surely harder. I’m sharing the thinking process that led me to my decision to perhaps help you ask the questions that need to be asked.

This is the third time my husband and I are doing the long-distance thing. While I still think choosing to live in two different places is ‘unnatural’ for a couple, I don’t think it’s weird or unnatural when a couple decide to do so.

Feel like a fraud? Stop right there.

“We’d like to make you an offer,” the e-mail began. I gasped, whispered yes!, briefly soaked in the feeling of sweet victory, and breathlessly shared the good news with a few people. Then, a few minutes later, it turned to disbelief with a tinge of doubt. Wait, what? They chose me? I wonder why… Note to self: STOP right there. I should’ve Googled it much sooner. Type > > I m p o s t o r   S y n d r o m e, and within seconds, I would’ve realised that I wasn’t alone—that feeling like a fraud was more common than I thought. It wasn’t until I came across Natalie Portman’s Harvard Commencement 2015 speech that it dawned on me: it’s NOT just me. Natalie Portman experiences it. Even Natalie Portman. The Natalie Portman. I felt a huge sense of relief. I was then able to detach myself from the “feeling” and look at it objectively. I read article after article and found out that it’s more common among women, and it’s common …

Credit: Steve Sawyer on Flickr (https://www.flickr.com/photos/stevesawyer/90354559/in/photolist-8Z6ge-P8uT7-P8kQ5-5WxosS-o2MMrW-b2JNaF-huYC7K-U62Qeo-5wh4EJ-4z9LEf-V9DNYB-iWejNE-iozhsS-nqegmH-qeekaF-4z9NVY-UJoGgU-4z5xaM-apgM7j-761JzB-5v4Yw1-5yFToJ-eBWbNx-d34hh3-mDXh72-n1jAYB-swb1eV-fP2Brz-4GKBNy-8msyYh-5y1ZbY-byphy4-9LE1CS-egmXRX-qGwHfU-RQ2EBc-pBR2Eo-8kwnWt-P8xG1-WdVgoR-a7XzWj-81JzpW-5T4V7s-ahsP8v-b633GT-5iqA1f-GkBCdy-azTBfD-RN39XN-4z5wrn)

Stereotypes: 5 reasons why you’re on the losing end

It’s a natural response when encountering the new or unknown, be it a person, place or thing—human beings size up whatever is before them, instinctively deciding whether it’s a friend or foe, a threat or an opportunity.

I am a so-called ‘third-culture’ kid. I am one type of Asian with mixed ancestry, raised in another Asian country with a completely different culture, studied in Chinese, British, American, and Canadian schools, speak four languages and later worked and lived in Russia and Europe.