All posts tagged: Mental Health

Photo by Scott Webb on Unsplash

Why do you do what you do?

Recently, I’ve had several conversations about motivation and intention—why some women aim to look a certain way, get really lean, strong or, some would say, “look like men”; post fitness progress pictures on Instagram; or pursue physical activity to an extent some would consider a little too much. Why yoga? Why crossfit? Why running? Why this or that?

Photo by Ksenia Makagonova on Unsplash

4 books to find your ‘why’ and figure out the ‘how’

What’s your why? That is the single most important question you should answer for yourself. Your why may stay the same or change over time, so it’s crucial to constantly reassess and always have this ultimate personal truth in mind. It’s not faux spirituality or an abstract new age concept. It’s logical and quite simple: how can you be the captain of your own life’s ship if you don’t know where you’re heading?

How do you measure your life?

The experience has taught me many things, one of which is this: there is no right answer to what success is. Because happiness is subjective, it isn’t rational to have a one-size-fits-all measuring stick for life. We get to decide how we measure the quality of the lives we live. Forget everyone else’s notion of success, happiness and fulfilment. The most accurate life compass you can rely on lies in your heart and the depths of your gut. 

Why I was wrong about yoga

In the last 10 to 15 years, yoga hit the mainstream and to a large extent, became a trend, a fashion statement, a social signature, or worse, something rich skinny girls did. I cringed at anything that seemed to be a result of ‘sheep mentality’ in order to prove one’s belonging to a social group, and that’s what I felt about yoga. I couldn’t understand the hype around it or the sometimes faux spirituality people had when talking about it. I was a kick-boxing, body-pumping, high-intensity exercise type of girl. Yoga was too slow, unchallenging, and was for those who wanted to “exercise” without putting in too much effort.

Well, if you’re a yogi, you might have been shaking your head from the first sentence. Clearly, I was so very wrong.

Credit: Arina Borodina on Flickr

Break free from vicious cycles

There’s an image that gives me the creeps — that feeling you get when you think something’s crawling on you, or a torturous itch you can’t scratch.

It’s the mental image of myself standing in the same spot, holding a ball and chain much like the one used in the hammer throw, using centrifugal force to keep the ball and chain in the air, circling on its own orbit. I feel stuck, unable to get out of position for fear of disrupting the circular path, therefore forced to actively keep spinning without leaving the exact same spot.

That’s the image I associate with vicious circles. Even thinking about it makes my body tense up.